Importance Of 1900 Buganda Agreement


Importance Of 1900 Buganda Agreement

Their arrival in Uganda was made difficult by the presence of Catholic and Protestant missionaries and by the Buganda war of succession that followed between 1888 and 1892. [4] This religiously inspired civil war coincided with the imperial ambitions of Great Britain, which was trying to secure Uganda as a colony because it was important for access to the Nile. [3] During the war, British colonial agents, according to the chief constable, Captain Frederick Lugard of the Imperial British East Africa Company (IBEAC), supported the Protestant faction led by Prime Minister (Katikiro) Apollo Kagwa. [4] Soon, IBEAC relinquished its control over Uganda after the wars forced it into bankruptcy. [3] In establishing Uganda`s northern border as the Kafu River, the 1894 Colvile Agreement formalized the promise that Uganda would obtain certain areas in exchange for their support against Bunyoro. [1] Two of the « lost counties » (Buyaga and Bugangaizi) were returned to Bunyoro after the referendum on lost counties in Uganda in 1964. [7] In English and Luganda in Mengo, Uganda, on 10 March 1900. 1935, Sir Philip Mitchell arrived in Uganda as governor after serving in Tanganjika for the past sixteen years. He was convinced that the relationship between Uganda and the protective power should have a different character than that of the local authorities and the Tanganjika government.

[9] Recognizing that the early protectorate had produced a pattern of growing distrust and clandestine change, Mitchell devised a plan to reform and restructure the system between the protectorate government and the Buganda government. [10] In asserting that the relationship between the protectorate government and the government of Buganda`s mother was that of protected and non-indirect domination, he planned to replace the post of provincial commissioner of Buganda with a resident and to remove district officials from the centre, provided that Kabaka was required to follow the advice of the resident and his collaborators. [9] However, under the Ugandan Convention of 1900, Kabaka was only required to respond to such advice in the case of the implementation of the Lukiiko resolutions. Relations between Kabaka, the protectorate government and its ministers deteriorated and, due to the limited power of the governor under the 1900 agreement to impose its council on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decline in the influence that the protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] 5. The laws enacted by Her Majesty`s Government for the General Management of the Ugandan Protectorate also apply to the Kingdom of Uganda, unless they conflict with the provisions of this agreement, in which case the provisions of that agreement constitute a particular exception with respect to the Kingdom of Uganda. After the signing of the Buganda Agreement of 1900, the restriction of other Buganda restrictions was reduced. The country of Uganda was divided for the Buganda government in Mailo country and for the British federal government in Kronland. The country of the Buganda government continued to be shared between people such as members of the royal family, the Lukiiko, the Muhammadanmain and some landowners. The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda[5] and, among others, By Bugandas Katikiro Apollo Kagwa on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), who was then an infant. and Sir Harry Johnston, on behalf of the British colonial government.