Agreement Between Israel And Palestine


Agreement Between Israel And Palestine

For nearly two decades, the United States has expressly supported a two-state solution that calls for separate Israeli and Palestinian states, with borders similar to those that existed before the 1967 war, including the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, and parts of East Jerusalem. The Clinton parameters provided the outlines of the creation of a Palestinian state and the resolution of other final status issues. George W. Bush was the first U.S. president to publicly support a Palestinian state represented in the 2003 road map for peace presented by the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. The Obama administration has also tried to advance a two-state solution, but talks failed in 2014 over disagreements over colonization, the release of Palestinian prisoners and other issues. In 2016, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Kerry outlined the principles of a two-state solution based on these final status discussions. « At some point, between a long period of time and a short period of time, » he said. « That`s what means temporary. » 2. Permanent status negotiations shall begin as soon as possible, but at the latest at the beginning of the third year of the transitional period, between the Government of Israel and the representatives of the Palestinian people. For years, the United States has officially condemned these settlements — they have been called obstacles to peace — but have not been directly called illegal to prevent Israel from facing international sanctions.

A 1978 State Department legal opinion states that Jewish settlements in the occupied territories are not permitted under international law, but President Ronald Reagan said in a 1981 interview that settlements were « ill-advised » but « not illegal. » George H.W. Bush was the first president to tie the amount of aid Israel would receive to his settlement building and deduct settlement construction costs from U.S. credit guarantees. Clinton, however, later authorized waivers for settlement construction in East Jerusalem and for « natural growth. » In 2004, George W. Bush wrote a letter to Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon in which he acknowledged that « new realities » or settlements would make it impossible for Israel to return to the pre-1967 borders in a peace agreement. Most governments are convinced that Israel would retain its three largest settlement blocs in a peace deal in exchange for the Palestinians taking out more land, believing it was unrealistic for Israel to force so many of its citizens out of the settlements. While the Obama administration took steps to protect Israel from political movements that wanted to punish Israeli companies operating in the West Bank, it also cracked down on Israeli settlements by abstaining in a UN Security Council vote declaring the settlements illegal. The Palestinian leadership has long opposed the normalization of relations between Israel and the Arab states, as that would legitimize the continuation of the occupation. (4) Both parties agree that the outcome of the permanent status negotiations should not be jeopardised or anticipated by agreements concluded for the transitional period. [1] During the slow pace of the Madrid talks, a series of secret meetings between Israeli and Palestinian negotiators took place in Oslo, Norway, which culminated in the Oslo Peace Accords between Palestinians and Israel in 1993, a plan that examined the elements and conditions necessary for a future Palestinian state « on the basis of Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338. » [36] The agreement officially titled Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements (DOP) was signed on September 13, 1993 on the White House lawn. . .

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